204 Lakeside Drive, Lewes, De 19958 | $199,900

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Property Details

Finally, a true townhouse with deeded land, so just an HOA fee and NO Condo dues!!! This 2-story home has a gorgeous kitchen w/granite countertops, pantry & Whirlpool Gold stainless steel appliances: French-door fridge w/bottom freezer, 5-burner smoo
  • MLS Number: 727575
  • Status: Active
  • Price: $199,900
  • Property Type:
  • Area: Lewes And Rehoboth Hundred
  • Community: Plantations East
  • School District: Cape Henlopen
  • Square Footage: 1,152
  • Year Built: 1997
  • Bedrooms: 2
  • Full Bathrooms: 2
  • Half Bathrooms: 1
  • Number of Stories: 2
  • Unit Floor Number: 1
  • New Construction: No
  • County Taxes: $794
  • Association Fee: $972
  • Water Fee: $512
  • Sewer Fee: $432
  • Pool: Other See Remarks
  • Furnished: No
  • Lot Dimensions: 16x100
  • Lot Square Feet: 1,307
  • Lot Size Acres: 0.03
  • Lot Description: Zero Lot Line
  • Water: Public Central Water
  • Sewer: Sewer-Public Central
  • Community Amenities: Pool-Mem. Opt., Pool-Outdoor, Tennis - Indoor, Tennis - Outdoor, Water/Lake Privilege

Interior Features

  • Kitchen: Breakfast Bar, Countertops - Granite, Island, Pantry
  • Heating: Forced Air, Gas - Propane
  • Cooling: Central A/C
  • Flooring: Carpet, Tile, Vinyl
  • Basement: Crawl Space,None
  • Attic: Floored
  • Security: Gated Community
  • Appliances: Cable TV Pre Wired, Dishwasher, Disposal, Dryer-Electric, Fridge w/Ice Maker, Microwave, Oven/Range Electric, Washer, Water Heater Gas
  • Interior Features: Cable TV Prewired, Ceiling Fan(s), Insulated Door(s), Insulated Window(s), Insulation, MBED-Full Bath, Screen(s), Window Treatments

Exterior Features

  • Style: Contemporary,Townhouse
  • Construction Type: Stick/Frame
  • Exterior Type: Wood
  • Roofing: Architectural Shingle
  • Foundation: Concrete Block
  • Garage: Other See Remarks
  • Parking: Driveway/Off Street
  • Porch/Deck/Patio: Porch - Screened
  • Exterior Features: Storage Shed/Outbuilding

Listing Courtesy of SEA BOVA ASSOCIATES INC.

Is that Sound You Hear the Lewes Mortgage Rate Alarm Bell?

In case you set your alarm clock to go off when it was time to buy a home, that clang you may be hearing from somewhere in the distance could be it (figuratively speaking, of course). The reason has to do with the direction of Lewes mortgage rates (among others).
Now, I realize this could come across a little bit like Aesop’s boy who cried ‘Wolf’ since a year and a half ago the experts were unanimous in predicting that mortgage rates would rise throughout 2014 (to at least 5%, if I remember correctly). And not only did they not jump—after a short rise, they actually fell!
The experts were wrong. To the extent I agreed with their call, I was, too—but at least I wasn’t lonely. And I also try to be clear that predicting the future of any financial movement is never a sure thing. The same is true today…but…
Last week, less than a week after the Federal Reserve monetary policymakers emerged from their meeting, Bankrate web commentator Janna Herron published a view that sent alarm bells ringing in my head. It makes so much sense, I feel compelled to share it. Already publicized in the rest of the media was the announcement that 15 of the 17 Fed officials now agree that they expect to raise the federal funds rate at some point within the next 6 months (and one expert was quoted as expecting that as early as September or October). Fifteen out of 17 is a 88% majority, so it couldn’t get much clearer. The funds rate has been cemented to the ground at precisely zero for almost seven years. Since 2008.
Lewes mortgage rates are based upon that Fed funds rate. When it rises, mortgage rates have to rise, or lenders would have to be reclassified as charitable enterprises (not likely). The reasons given for the Fed governors’ near-unanimous prediction are both the rise in the pace of job gains and, as was reported, “The Fed also noted improvement in housing.”
Now, that news may have prompted Lewes mortgage-rate watchers to sit up and take notice—but not necessarily have them hearing alarm bells going off. But there were two other pieces of information:
· First, the current national mortgage rates reported last week rose. They were pegged at just over the 52-week average for 30-year fixed loans, but at 4.13% it remained below the 4.33% of a year before. In other words, still (perhaps momentarily) in the historically basement-level range.
· Second, new mortgage activity began to rise, moving 1.6% up from a week before. Applications had been dropping, but now they were on the move. This while home builder confidence levels soared, with expectations hitting the highest levels in nearly a decade.
As with any batch of economic numbers, the signs can be interpreted in multiple ways, but one way sure does seem to stand out: mortgage rates are attractive now, housing activity is almost certainly on the rise, and mortgage rates and monthly payments are very likely to become more expensive. The same thought may be occurring to more and more people as we enter the summer home-buying season: “What if I could pay less every month for the same home…for the next 30 years…”
Note to Lewes home-buyers. Listen carefully: that could be the sound of your own alarm bell going off! If you think you hear it, now would be a great time to give me a Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at russellstucki@remax.net, visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

World Series is Over: Your Home Selling Negotiations Aren’t

When it comes to appraising and developing appropriate responses to offers on your Delaware home, I’m there to offer counsel and guidance. Even so, you are the ultimate decision maker. Especially for Delaware homeowners without previous selling experience, becoming familiar with some practical pointers for home selling negotiations is well worth doing. Delaware sellers can find one rich source at the National Association of Realtors® web site. This month’s World Series finale undoubtedly inspired the title for a list of home selling negotiation pitfalls. Published the morning of Houston’s Game 7 victory, it dealt with errors in home selling negotiations. It was subtitled “Negotiation Hardball Fouls.” 

Although the first “foul” was “starting a bidding war,” that was a slight overstatement. Obviously, a bidding war is any Delaware seller’s ideal situation. What was spotlighted was how that situation could be mishandled. One misstep is setting an offer deadline too far in the future because time-pressed buyers might disappear. Another foul ball is passing up an already strong offer that might not reappear.

Another home selling negotiation tactic that Delaware sellers should think twice before adopting is being overly tough when responding to repair requests. That’s similar to “being stubborn” about a host of other relatively minor points like setting the closing date, closing cost payment requests, and squabbling over inclusion list items.

Another tactic that might result in an expensive misfire: threatening to put the property back on the market. The problem here isn’t only the stigma sometimes attached to the “put back on the market” tag. It’s also the fact that interested buyers you’d expect to return might have moved on.

The valuable insight that underlies all of the NAR examples is a guiding principle I believe to be valid for all home selling negotiations. When you are coming down the home stretch (or are in game 7 of the Series), evaluate every aspect of an offer as part of the whole transaction. Individual details that might seem emotionally important lose their clout when viewed in relation to the whole. In other words, as every major (and minor) league batting coach will tell you, if you want to make contact, keep your eye on the ball.

No matter how exciting it might be, any World Series Game 7 is only a game. When it comes to selling your Delaware home, it’s a much more meaningful exercise to the families it will affect for years to come. I keep that in mind during every aspect of your Delaware home’s sale, from the listing’s preparation to the final home selling negotiations. Call me! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at russellstucki@remax.net, visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com